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Add trendy stores to rehab efforts

August 30, 2013

On an almost daily basis, I have a conversation with myself on the way to wor....

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(8)

Molson

Sep-15-13 7:56 PM

Unfortunately, the demographics in the downtown Warren area are not suitable to support any new business ventures. If a national company thought they could make money in Warren City they would already be there. It appears the only demand which exists in downtown Warren of late is for dollar stores. Demographically the general Warren City area has to be at the bottom of the socio-economic ladder and therefore has nothing to offer new business.

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SURV69

Sep-08-13 2:26 PM

nativio289:

I thought the rent was very reasonable back in the 1990's, but that was for an upstairs office and no store front.

So ... better yet for some enterprising entrepreneur(s), to find a niche' with specialty shops ... and take a chance ...

EVERY day a few hundred county workers, city workers, attorneys and other people doing business on or very near the town square who have "wants" that might be delivered by little specialty shops that little needs and are unique enough not to be found anywhere else close by.

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nativio289

Sep-06-13 11:57 AM

Nobody will open up trendy anything until some segment of the population shows that they will support something other than Chinese buffets, Mexican food, bad Italian food and steakhouses.

The people of Trumbull County, for the most part, don't want good cuisine. They want garbage Americanized ethnic food and corporate chain nonsense.

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nativio289

Sep-05-13 8:36 PM

Surv, rent on the square is by no means exspensive.

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MajorMajorMajorMajor

Sep-05-13 6:33 PM

Variety is the spice of life, comrades! Besides...a Starbucks on Parkman won't kill the beloved, downtown Mocha House anymore than a Dairy Queen on Elm is going to kill a Katie's Korner ice cream shop on Mahoning.

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SURV69

Sep-05-13 1:27 PM

I have to say I disagree with the specific choices of the writer, but I agree with the premise.

BTW ... it appears the Mocha House does just fine and it's very close to the square.

Small, unique, personable specialty shops seem to me to be a great way to liven up the square and to get people downtown.

But generally, downtown(and especially on the square), real estate might be pretty costly rent.

Maybe some sort of incubator business for small, unique, personable, specialty businesses could be an idea?

That, along with a re-evaluation of the 2-hrs parking "per day".

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KnowTheFacts

Sep-04-13 3:07 PM

I agree with the writer. A combination of local and big business is needed. One coffee shop downtown and absolutely none in any other direction in the city isn't enough to attract people to live here. More businesses also mean more job opportunities for existing and potential residents.

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DubCityUnited

Aug-31-13 12:38 PM

A lot of the tenets of this piece are certainly accurate- it will of course take a combination of public, private, and non-profit investments in housing, infrastructure, schools, crime and safety, retail and dining, you name it, for revitalization to work. However the example chosen represents a fatal flaw in the approach... Why do we need a corporate owned Starbucks when we have the locally owned Mocha House wedged right between downtown and the residential central city? To improve any area, you start with your existing local assets. The demographic pointed out here has shown over and over, city by city, a willingness to support local business as a part of the value of an urban center. Corporate disinvestment has played a huge role in the demise of our neighborhoods; I think we should look locally for existing resources before we hope for corporate saviors. What good is a revitalization if all the profits leave the area!

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